Sight Words Coloring Page

Pre-Primer Sight Words Printable

Both of my father’s parents were educators, but my father struggled to read. By the time he was in high school, he could technically read, but his comprehension was limited. It took him so long to figure out each individual word, he struggled to string the words together to decipher their meaning.

When my father was a child, whole word teaching or memorizing the entire word was employed to teach children to read. Today early readers begin with letter sounds and phonics. Once letter sounds and phonics are readily understood, young readers start memorizing high-frequency words to improve reading comprehension. For children, the proficiency of learning to read and write increases as they learn common sight words for ready recall and have the ability to sound out new words.

Dolch Sight Words

Edward Dolch recognized some words are used more frequently than others in written text. He felt reading fluency improves when children easily recognize these words.

In 1937, Dolch made the first attempt to teach sight words. The Dolch sight words list is compiled of 95 nouns and 220 other non-noun words typically found in children’s books of that time for children in kindergarten through second grade. Each Dolch sight word is ordered by reading age. In the Dolch system, reading ages are pre-primer, primer, first grade, second grade, and third grade.

Fry Sight Words

In 1950, Edward Fry felt a complete sight words list should include the most frequently used words in reading materials for children in grades third through eighth. Fry’s complete list contains one thousand of the most frequently used words according to the American Heritage Word Frequency Book.

Fry breaks his word lists into ten different lists. The first 100 most common words, the second 100 most common words, and so on until he gets to the 10th 100 most common words list. Fry’s word lists include all word types.

The Fry Sight Words list was updated in 1980 for the most common words used at that time in children's literature.

Free Printable Coloring Page

Once a young reader understands letter sounds and the basics of phonics, numerous methods can be employed to help young readers memorize sight words. Flashcards work well but are monotonous. (As a young mother, I spent most mornings running through basic high-frequency words on flashcards with my current kindergartner.)

Here at Teacher Power, we choose to have fun with sight word games over flashcards any day.

To prove our fun-loving learning style, enjoy this free sight word printable coloring page. This coloring printable lets the child choose the color associated with a given sight word to paint their owl. Get ready to view some psychedelic owls.

This sight word printable is designed for late pre-school/kindergarten learners. It incorporates words from Fry’s 1st 100 words or Dolch’s pre-primer words. The sight words on the printable include come, up, this, me, said, the, go, you, and, am.

My father learned to read fluently after he graduated from high school. Early in their marriage, my mother taught him to sound out words, and it made all the difference. He loved reading Westerns and history. After a hard day’s work, he spent many an evening enjoying a good book.

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Article by Miss Jae

 

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Sources:

Bales, Kris. "What Are Fry Words?" ThoughtCo. 2021. https://www.thoughtco.com/what-are-fry-words-4172325

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