Get More Energy

Fatigued? Look Past Drinks that Give You ENERGY

Energy is the power, the strength, and the vitality required to perform mentally and physically. Your body is a complex machine.

Think of your car. It is fueled by gas. If you only add gas and never change the oil, it becomes more difficult for your car to power efficiently. If you continue to ignore the oil, you will damage the engine. Adding gas to the tank and changing the motor oil are not the only things that have to be kept up or properly tuned to maintain your reliable wheels.

Keep Your Machine in Top Condition

Proper maintenance is just as important for your body to keep firing efficiently on all six cylinders. If your system is out of whack, a caffeinated beverage is like a Band-Aid. It is a very short-term solution to your energy problem.

According to a Healthline Media article that was medically reviewed by a licensed dietician, there are four important things you should be doing to reduce fatigue and naturally boost your energy.

Eat the right Carb/Protein/Fat mix

Carbs are the only energy source used by red blood cells and the brain. Carbs also fuel muscles during workouts. At a bare minimum, an adult needs 130 grams of carbohydrates a day to fuel red blood cells, the brain, and the central nervous system.

Protein breaks down into amino acids. Three essential amino acids leucine, isoleucine, and valine are required in abundance to build and repair muscle. Protein can also be turned into glucose to fuel workouts after carb sources are depleted.

Fats are important for cell structure, brain functioning, and absorbing some essential micronutrients.

In the following table, we list the Carbs/Protein/Fats consumption ranges as given in the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. The table also lists good energy-boosting sources for each macronutrient.

 

Recommend Range of total Calories 

 

Good Energy-boosting Sources 

Carbs 

45-65% 

Vegetables, Fruits, Whole Grains, Legumes 

Protein 

10-30% 

Fish, Dairy, Chicken, Eggs, Pea Protein 

Fats 

25-35% 

Omega 3 Fatty Acids found in Canola, Soybean, or Flaxseed Oil or cold-water fish like Salmon or Mackerel 

 

Determining the right energy-boosting mix for you depends on your age, gender, and activity level. Males need more fiber from complex carbs than females and slightly more protein than females. For prostate health, males benefit from less plant-based omega 3 fats. Individuals with more muscle mass and/or activity need 20% more protein than less active individuals.

To reduce fatigue, reduce simple carbohydrates including white grains and sugar and instead choose to eat from the best food sources. For a healthy snack, you can get all three macronutrients by eating a banana spread with a tablespoon of peanut butter.

Stay Hydrated

“Under relatively mild levels of dehydration, individuals engaging in rigorous physical activity will experience decrements in performance related to reduced endurance, increased fatigue, altered thermoregulatory capability, reduced motivation, and increased perceived effort.” - Water, Hydration and Health, a Review.

Be Active

Exercise is a natural energy booster because it increases endorphin and serotonin levels. Endorphins boost pleasure and reduce pain leaving us feeling energized. Serotonin promotes communication between the brain and the body while aiding in digestion and sleep. You can’t expect good energy levels if you don’t sleep well.

Take a Vitamin and Mineral Supplement

Missing essential micronutrients found in vitamins and minerals may cause fatigue. If you are just dragging despite all you do to eat a healthy diet, stay hydrated, exercise, and sleep, consult a medical professional. Something might be out of whack. A nutritional assessment may be warranted along with a vitamin or mineral supplement.

The health benefits of maintaining your complex machine with proper diet, exercise, and sleep far out weight the numerous possible side effects of the added sugar and chemicals found in many energy drinks on the market.

But there are Days...

It is totally normal to have a day or a time of day when you need a boost of energy to get over a hump. Life happens and on somedays you may need the energy-boosting benefit of caffeine. Caffeine stimulates the central nervous system and has been clinically shown to help boost cognitive and physical functioning.

Energy Drinks

On a day you are dragging, an energy drink is tempting. But you still want to keep your machine in top condition and make wise consumption choices. Many marketed energy-boosting drinks are not healthy energy drinks. Red bull, Monster Energy, NOS, Rockstar, 5-hour energy, etc. are heavily processed and loaded with chemicals and sugar.

Several ingredients in these energy drinks are marketed as energy boosters. However, they have either not been sufficiently studied, don’t appear to boost energy, or are required in large doses to be effective performance enhancers.

If you are looking for a natural energy drink that contains caffeine. Coffee, green tea, and yerba mate are as natural as you will get. The amounts of caffeine vary in each of these choices. Depending on the brand and the brewing method, a cup of coffee contains between 62-96 mg of caffeine, a cup of green tea 35-95 mg, and a cup of yerba mate 75 mg.

Even with these healthy choices, you need to be aware of the additional ingredients added at coffee houses to make your cup of choice more palatable. Many natural choices are made unhealthy with added sugar, milk, and cream.

Sugar is a simple carbohydrate and temporarily boosts energy by quickly raising blood sugar levels. This energy boost only lasts for forty-five minutes to an hour before an energy crash. Consuming sugar and excess saturated fat is not beneficial to your smooth-running machine.

Teacher Power Energy Drink

With less than fourteen ingredients, Teacher Power Energy Drink’s formula is simple and cost-effective. Our product contains 100 mg of caffeine and a full array of B vitamins to aid your machine’s ability to metabolize and acquire energy from carbs, proteins, and fats. Teacher Power Energy drink does not contain excess chemicals ‘deemed’ as energy boosters.

You don’t have to worry about blood sugar spikes with Teacher Power Energy Drinks since we have slightly sweetened it with sucralose. Teacher Power’s Drinks come in three nostalgic flavors: Strawberry Lemonade, Fruit Punch, and Black Cherry.

Given Teacher Power Energy Drink costs only $0.36 per serving, what is stopping you from using this simple energy boost on the days you are dragging? You can conveniently order it at TeacherPower.org or on Amazon.com.

 

Ingesting caffeine may temporarily spike blood pressure and cause jitteriness. Regular caffeine use will build caffeine tolerance requiring the user to increase caffeine consumption over time to experience the same stimulating effects.

 

Article by Miss Jae

 

The content of Teacher Power’s website is for information only, not advice or guarantee of outcome. Information is gathered and shared from reputable sources; however, Teacher Power is not responsible for errors or omissions in reporting or explanation. No individuals, including those taking Teacher Power products, should use the information, resources or tools contained within to self-diagnosis or self-treat any health-related condition. Teacher Power gives no assurance or warranty regarding the accuracy, timeliness or applicability of the content.

Sources:

Barta, Kristen. “Healthy Energy Drinks: Is there such a thing?” Healthline. 2017. https://www.healthline.com/health/energy-drinks-healthy-alternatives

Heneman, Karrie et al. “Nutrition and Health Info Sheet: Energy Drinks.” University of California, Davis. 2007. https://anrcatalog.ucanr.edu/pdf/8265.pdf

Penner, Elle. “Ask the Dietitian: What’s the Best Carb, Protein, Fat Breakdown to Lose Weight.” My Fitness Pal. 2020. https://blog.myfitnesspal.com/ask-the-dietitian-whats-the-best-carb-protein-and-fat-breakdown-for-weight-loss/

“Good Nutrition: Should Guidelines Differ for Men and Women?” Harvard Health Publishing. 2006. https://www.health.harvard.edu/newsletter_article/good-nutrition-should-guidelines-differ-for-men-and-women. Updated September

Popkin, Barry M et al. “Water, hydration, and health.” Nutrition reviews. 2010. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2908954/

“Caffeine Chart.” Center for Science in the Public Interest. 2021. https://cspinet.org/eating-healthy/ingredients-of-concern/caffeine-chart

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