Bath Temp for Bath Bomb

What’s the Right Bath Water Temperature for Your Bath Bomb Soak?

Are you looking to totally relax in a luxurious bath with warm water and a fizzy bath bomb? 

Here are some great tips to make your bath time timeout perfect for you.

Fizz up the Bath Bomb

A bath bomb’s fizz comes from a chemical reaction. Bath bombs contain sodium carbonate which is a base and citric acid with is an acid. These two components start reacting to each other when they are activated by water.

The hotter your bath water, the faster your bath bomb will fizz. Heat adds thermal energy to water making individual water molecules bounce around like energetic toddlers.

These bouncing hot water molecules cause the basic and acidic components of the bath bomb to collide together more frequently than cold water molecules do. Hence, the increased thermal energy hastens the chemical reaction making the fizz bomb bubble over fast.

Numerous science fair experiments have been conducted to connect bath bomb fizz to water temperature. You can watch a bomb’s fizz development based on water temperature in a visual experiment here.

Take note of the three water temperatures in the experiment. The hottest water is over 179 degrees Fahrenheit. That is way too hot to take a bath in. The warm water is just over 90 degrees Fahrenheit. Given 90 degrees Fahrenheit is more than 8 degrees below normal body temperature, that’s too cool for a hot bath.

However, at the two-minute mark, the warm water’s fizz is just starting to bubble over whereas the hot water is all fizzed out. The sweet spot for your luxurious bath is somewhere between these two temperatures.

 

What Temperature Should Your Bath Water Be

While some advocate for bathing in very hot or very cold water, the magic temperature for your bath or shower water is between 104- and 112-degrees Fahrenheit (40 and 44.4 degrees Celsius).

Dr. Melissa Piliang, dermatologist with the Cleveland Clinic, says the ideal water temperature to wash away environmental dirt and bacteria is 112 degrees or lower.

A bathwater study conducted in the UK by physiologist Steve Faulker found soaking in a constant warm bath temperature of 104 degrees Fahrenheit for one hour resulted in an energy expenditure equal to a 30-minute brisk walk.

A Japanese study showed immersion bathing improved participants phycological health including reduced levels of stress and sufficient sleep and rest.

Reap the Rewards of a Hot Bath Today!

You can gain all the physical and emotional benefits of a hot water bath with the water temperature between 104- and 112-degrees Fahrenheit. You will burn calories, have clean skin, reduce stress levels, and enjoy the relaxation that comes from just the right amount of fizz in a bath bomb.

Take a look at Soaks and Skrubs bath bomb selections to start enjoying all the advantages of a hot bath today!

 

Article by Miss Jae

 

Sources:

Mitchell, Heidi. “Burning Question: What is the Best Water Temperature for Your Bath or Shower?” The Wall Street Journal. 2016. https://www.wsj.com/articles/burning-question-what-is-the-best-water-temperature-for-your-bath-or-shower-1451931152

Suttell, Scott. “To Stay out of the Hot Water, Take Your Shower at 112 Degrees.” Crains Cleveland Business. 2016. https://www.crainscleveland.com/article/20160105/BLOGS03/160109952/to-stay-out-of-hot-water-take-your-showers-at-112-degrees

Dockrill, Peter. “Does Taking a Hot Bath Really Burn as Many Calories as a 30-Minute Walk? Science Alert. 2018. https://www.sciencealert.com/does-taking-a-hot-bath-burn-calories-30-minute-walk-passive-heating-diabetes

Goto, Yasuaki et al. “Physical and Mental Effects of Bathing: A Randomized Intervention Study.” Hindawi. 2018. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6011066/

 

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